Agency Life

CINCO: Jim Gaffigan Admits He Doesn’t Drive A Car.


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I’m watching Jim Gaffigan’s new Netflix Comedy Special Cinco and I’m chuckling. Ha, ha, fat dad, yatta, yatta, then all of a sudden he says something that loses me to the point I can’t watch his comedy special anymore.

… I don’t even own a car because I’m a good person. No, I live in New York City and I have five kids. I just have them carry me around. I know nothing about cars

… most of the accessories are wasted on me. I’ve never used cruise control. The heated seats, I always feel like I’ve just wet myself.

… When I go home to Indiana, I always rent a car. My brother Mitch is always like, “What kinda car ya renting?” I’m like uhh it’s blue. [Mitch] Is that 4 or 6 cylinders? [Jim] Blue.

I do know the most manly form of transportation is a pick up truck.

UMMMM, hold the phone. Aren’t you the spokesperson for the Chrysler Pacifica?!

You are all over television pitching this minivan for dads!

WTF are you doing?!

I work in advertising and used to work on Hyundai. Auto is hard and I know how much celebrities get paid for endorsements. I don’t even work on the Chrysler business or know anyone who does but I was mad when I heard that.

Jim Gaffigan just basically said, I got paid a fuck ton of money to promote a minivan, yet I don’t drive a car and men, you’re pussies if you don’t drive a truck.

Holy BALLS! In less than :30 seconds you’ve broken any psychological brand loyalty or interest anyone has formed from watching your commercials after they see your comedy special.

The FTC has specific guidelines around celebrity endorsements.

§ 255.1 General considerations.

(b) The endorsement message need not be phrased in the exact words of the endorser, unless the advertisement affirmatively so represents. However, the endorsement may not be presented out of context or reworded so as to distort in any way the endorser’s opinion or experience with the product. An advertiser may use an endorsement of an expert or celebrity only so long as it has good reason to believe that the endorser continues to subscribe to the views presented. An advertiser may satisfy this obligation by securing the endorser’s views at reasonable intervals where reasonableness will be determined by such factors as new information on the performance or effectiveness of the product, a material alteration in the product, changes in the performance of competitors’ products, and the advertiser’s contract commitments.

(c) When the advertisement represents that the endorser uses the endorsed product, the endorser must have been a bona fide user of it at the time the endorsement was given. Additionally, the advertiser may continue to run the advertisement only so long as it has good reason to believe that the endorser remains a bona fide user of the product.
[See § 255.1(b) regarding the “good reason to believe” requirement.]

“Additionally, the advertiser may continue to run the advertisement only so long as it has good reason to believe that the endorser remains a bona fide user of the product.”

He’s not only not currently a user, he openly admits he doesn’t own a car or use any of the amenities.

Open toilet bowl, toss lots of money in, flush toilet.